LATEST NEWS
Financial Fridays (Aired February 12, 2016)

Friday February 12th, Financial Fridays aired on the Vegas All Net Radio (VANR). This week’s guests included:

Stan the Annuity Man, a.k.a. Stan Haithcock, is a nationally recognized expert on annuities known for his transparency, honesty, and endless research. He has spoken at every major financial trade show in the United States. He is rigorously independent, representing all major carriers that meet his uncompromisingly high standards. With a financial background that spans some of the major wirehouse organizations such as Dean Witter, Morgan Stanley, Paine Webber and UBS, Stan brings to his clients an informed clarity and “insider” wisdom that makes him extra careful and cognizant of risks and how to avoid them. In 2005, when Stand became Stan The Annuity Man he determined that each client deserved his undivided personal attention and that his mission was to become a trusted member of each client’s “Financial Team.” That meant he would be known for fly-to-your-home-coast-to-coast service. Today Stan does indeed have clients nationwide.

Clare K. Levison is a certified public accountant and national financial literacy spokesperson for the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants (AICPA). She has appeared on major radio and television networks across the country and has served as a member of the Virginia Society of Certified Public Accountants (VSCPA) Board of Directors. She was named one of the 2010 Top Five CPAs Under Thirty-Five by the VSCPA. Clare has more than a decade of corporate accounting experience and is also an active volunteer, serving as PTA president, Girl Scout leader, and Sunday school teacher. She lives in Blacksburg, Virginia, with her husband and two daughters.

Financial Fridays

If you have any questions about anything discussed on the show, or if you would like to be a guest, please contact Financial Fridays host Scott Taylor at staylor@pbtk.com or 702-384-1120. Scott W. Taylor’s tax practice focuses on services for a wide range of clients including real estate partnerships, limited liability companies, large and small closely-held corporations and not-for-profit organizations. He started with PBTK in 1992 and was made a Shareholder in January 2005. In addition to his tax work, he also provides services for business consulting, deal structuring, receivership and litigation support services.

Read More...
LATEST BLOGS
Work From Home? You MIGHT have Home Office Deductions

More and more people are working from home - either full-time of on a flex schedule. But just because you have a home office space doesn’t mean you can deduct expenses associated with it.

Eligibility requirements

If you’re an employee, your use of your home office must be for your employer’s convenience, not just your own. If you’re self-employed, generally your home office must be your principal place of business, though there are exceptions.

Whether you’re an employee or self-employed, the space must be used regularly (not just occasionally) and exclusively for business purposes. If, for example, your home office is also a guest bedroom or your children do their homework there, you can’t deduct the expenses associated with that space.

A valuable break

If you are eligible, the home office deduction can be a valuable tax break. You may be able to deduct a portion of your mortgage interest, property taxes, insurance, utilities and certain other expenses, as well as the depreciation allocable to the office space.

Or you can take the simpler “safe harbor” deduction in lieu of calculating, allocating and substantiating actual expenses. The safe harbor deduction is capped at $1,500 per year, based on $5 per square foot up to a maximum of 300 square feet.

More considerations

For employees, home office expenses are a miscellaneous itemized deduction. This means you’ll enjoy a tax benefit only if these expenses plus your other miscellaneous itemized expenses exceed 2% of your adjusted gross income (AGI).

If, however, you’re self-employed, you can deduct eligible home office expenses against your self-employment income.

Finally, be aware that we’ve covered only a few of the rules and limits here. If you think you may be eligible for the home office deduction, contact us" target="_blank">contact us for more information.

Read More...